Introduce Yourself - Important Links

Hi friends,

Totally New baby and enjoying of Crypto world since last 6 months only.

doing self business and father of sweet angel.

Feeling Nice to be here.

Regards

Dvyanc

Hi all!

I’ve been following cryptocurrencies since Bitcoin hit around $100, decided they were too unstable to be worth an investment. I’m still not really into investing in cryptocurrencies just yet, but I certainly find them interesting, and I think Peercoin is the best coin in circulation right now.

Hello everyone,

My name is Chris. I am the authur of the upcoming book called Cryptocurency “The Alt-ernative” A beginner’s Reference.

I am currently researching Peercoin. It is included in the book with its own four pages.

Any questions, feel free to ask :smiley:

Hello everyone,

I found out about peercoin a little to late to do the rasperrypi giveaway. I realized I had some spare servers idling. I then set up a full node and wanted to begin minting, but then found out I need some coins first! Anyway, I plan on creating a guide to setting up the daemon on linux servers if one doesn’t already exist. Now I just need some peercoins :slight_smile:

Hi Mr.Coiner

You can still get a tip for setting up a Raspberry Pi node :slight_smile:
http://peer4commit.com/projects/103
http://www.peercointalk.org/index.php?topic=2800.0

Hello all,

I am the founder of the Coinomi universal wallet and the latest version supports sending and receiving Peercoins along with other 7 coins.
The wallet stores your keys on your device using the deterministic keychain BIP44.

Hope you find it useful and it would be great if you gave some feedback.

Sincerely,

Giannis Dzegoutanis

Welcome! Your wallet seems very nice to use. Thank you for including Peercoin support.

Glad you like it!

Newbie here.

Have tinkered with BTC (and to a lesser degree LTC) for a year or so.

I’ve been lurking here for a while and decided to register.

Bought both PPC and NSR, and would like to set up a PeerBox. Raspberry Pi should be here in a day or two! I’ll have a few PeerBox questions - I’ll post in the appropriate place.

Thanks, and look forward to being part of what looks like an interesting group.

[quote=“badgolfer, post:30, topic:2889”]Newbie here.

Have tinkered with BTC (and to a lesser degree LTC) for a year or so.

I’ve been lurking here for a while and decided to register.

Bought both PPC and NSR, and would like to set up a PeerBox. Raspberry Pi should be here in a day or two! I’ll have a few PeerBox questions - I’ll post in the appropriate place.

Thanks, and look forward to being part of what looks like an interesting group.[/quote]

Welcome badgolfer! You are right, the peercoin community is really fantastic.

Just sayin ghello for the sake of getting my two posts in.

I’m new to XPM, but have a query I’ll post in a new thread.

Ta.

Hi!
I am really fascinated by cryptocurrencies and I want to learn more about PoS, Peercoin seems to have a very bright future.

Greetings,

I recently took a long position with Peercoin after doing research on a variety of cryptocurrencies. The theoretical possibility of a Bitcoin 51% attack make me uncomfortable so I began looking into POS coins. Peercoin was not flashy but I saw the technology as superior, the monetary policy as sound, and it is truly “built to last”. I am not a very technical person but Peercoin made logical sense to me. It has a simple elegance and I hope more people start seeing what I did.

  • Q

Hello everybody!

New to mining, I have 2 antminer s4’s and 1 antminer s3+. Been mining for about 2 months.

Im currently hashing on D7 with 2.4 th/s and also hashing on ecoining with 1.8 th/s. I have a total of about 4.2 th/s, was wondering how to solo mine with antminer s4’s. They have built in CGminer software, and I’m not totally sure how to point them in the right direction?

I looked at the tutorials, but they describe solo mining using asic’s that are connected to the pc. Is there a way to do it with asic’s that are standalone units like the s4 and s3?

PPC:PLj8BUJKafoWezPGZiEPd9JbrEu8YZTfxX

Howdy all.

Long-time lurker. What turned me onto to PPC long ago was Sunny King’s idea in the early days of a pegged transaction fee - I think that has interesting effects on incentives for users and implications for data applications built off the blockchain.

This had got me thinking about what problems cryptocurrency was actually best-suited to solve. The results of my thinking more or less landed me in the same boat as SK, with regard to a backbone currency and thinking of Peercoin as moreso solving the ACH problem, rather than the PayPal problem.

I have worries about the long-term survival of bitcoin.

Blockchain size and mining pools has devolved the bitcoin network into a (large) handful of supernodes. Additionally the consensus algorithm for bitcoin is tied to the physical world, rather than the virtual.

People think bitcoin will be here forever, even if it tanks. I don’t think so. I think a single market crash will be irrecoverable.

The reasoning is simple:

  • Over time, an equilibrium is reached between costs (e.g. electricity consumed) for miners and bitcoin reward from obtaining blocks.
  • Mining hardware does not go away when difficultly is lowered, as it exists in the physical realm. It merely gets turned off.
  • If the bitcoin market crashed to $1, the equilibrium of electricity cost / hashpower / bitcoin reward converted to $ is adjusted rapidly to prevent loss of $. This means a large percentage of miners would be no longer have an incentive to mine, as they would operate on a loss, and thus they would turn off their hardware…
  • Or would they? Now we have a bunch of miners with mining hardware, unable to mine because cost > block reward.
  • The incentive at that point is to use their massive hashpower to attack the network, rather than secure it. Recognizing there haven’t been any particularly interesting 51% attacks yet (other than Luke Jr’s on a altcoin), once the incentives are lined up I have no doubt people will get creative.

tl;dr
If bitcoin price tanks, a large % of miners will cease mining to secure the network because the cost of mining outweighs the reward. These miners still have their hardware though, and now have incentive to attack the network (as their is nothing else to do with their specialized hardware, and they gotta recoup those hardware costs somehow).

As such, I’m throwing in my towel for Peercoin as the long-term cryptocurrency. I think the incentives are correct, the consensus algorithm is better long-term, and I like the progress shown with cold minting.

I’m a programmer, and will be experimenting with some data-apps built off the peercoin blockchain. I’ll keep the community abreast of those as they develop (and look forwards to the sidechains for data-apps Sunny has been teasing us about). Looking forward to being involved here.

  • Emeth
1 Like

My Fellow Peercoiners,

I hope you are having a wonderful day. My name is DigiX and I am a new poster here in Peercoin Talk. I created this post to introduce myself.

My journey with crypto currency started with Bitcoin. At first, I thought Bicoin was a fad. However, I came to realized that Bitcoin was more than a fad. So I decided to do my due diligence. After doing my research, I perceived the advantages of Bitcoin. However, I fell in love more with the concept of crypto currency after envisioning the potential of this disruptive technology. After noticing the flaws of Bitcoin, I decided to seek a better version of it. So my thirst for a better crypto currency led me here.

Thank you for reading my post and I am looking forward to an informative time with you!

Regards,
DigiX
Newbie
Peercoin Talk

P.S.
If you don’t mind giving this newb some peer coin, feel free to send me some.

Hello.

Disclaimer - I have 0 currency at all invested in BitCoin or Peercoin or any other cryptocurrencies. I’m new, but I like what I see. I have some questions that aren’t exactly FAQ. I’ll set the stage with a brief description of my understanding of currency and crypto currencies before I ask any questions. That’ll give you an idea as to where I’m coming from.

Government backed currency is government backed because people trust (heh) that the government will keep the currency scarce. Hyperinflation is a valid fear, and essentially means that the government is printing money. Government also ensures that their currency has a minimum number of forged notes - essentially this is the same thing as saying that the government tries to ensure that each note of its currency is valid, and can only be spent once (a forgery of a legit note would hopefully be caught and weeded out). Without these two fundamental features, no government issued currency is worth the paper it’s printed on. For most of human history, government (or its proxies) served as a trust store for their currencies. No trust in the government to maintain scarcity and ensure honesty (eg minimum fraud, among other things), the currency is worthless.

Cryptocurrency solves both of these problems. The currency mined/minted is scarce. Forgery is unlikely due to ingenious developments in solving a long standing computer problem known as the Byzantine Generals’ Problem. Using this technology, we now have a number of possible currencies that don’t require a government to ensure that the two primary conditions for currency are met. Note that there are other issues that can and should be discussed - inflation, overhead (eg electricity costs), but those details will get ironed as the technology evolves.

Now to my points of interest. Given that fiat/government style of money requires a government, and crypto does not, can we reflect these requirements such that cryptocurrencies not only are currency, but provide scarcity and trust? The most interesting of which being trust, (scarcity is ironically quite common all things considered). Trust that certain events/transactions took place, without requiring a costly third party (eg government) to verify it. This trust stems from the public ledger. Trust is valuable not just for currency, but contracts and other legal agreements (eg such and such corporation formed on this day, with these persons attached to it. Later, such and such company issues shares, held by X, Y, Z, etc). It’s valuable for a company or a union or any other group, as well. If it’s an unalterable fact that a decision was made, actions were taken, then the public ledger can be used to decide things such as fault, fraud, incompetence, etc for any actions and agreements recorded in the public ledger. Rather than taking disagreements to court and having these details surface in the public record - and at great public expense - the details are already public.

It also opens the door for another type of regulatory power - public and private scrutiny, not just from individuals, but competitors, media, and other external third parties (eg environmental protection groups) who can call to attention any … troubling issues logged in the public ledger. Capitalizing on the trust built into the public ledgers of cryptocurrencies opens up a whole new avenue of self governance (with little to no reliance on a central government that can be bought or manipulated). The potential for the market to freely and open examine its actions, and to correct course more rapidly, is tremendous.

Why am I not hearing more about this aspect of cryptocurrencies? Am I way off in thinking like this? Yes, it’ll require a radical change in how business and government (and other groups) operate. Publically, and open to complete scrutiny. Yes, there are some technical issues to address (anonymity and pseudo anonymity for individuals. I don’t believe that groups deserve anonymity as a whole, as these groups tend to be capable of committing too much damage even with the best of intentions). But I think cryptocurrencies are a radical change from government backed currencies. Are we just too in the early stages? Is there someone working on something like this?

Thanks, and I hope to learn more soon!

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=895974.0

The conversation at the link above shows that some people are starting to think about this issue mentioned in my post below. Will be interesting to see what happens.

[quote=“emeth, post:36, topic:2889”]Howdy all.

Long-time lurker. What turned me onto to PPC long ago was Sunny King’s idea in the early days of a pegged transaction fee - I think that has interesting effects on incentives for users and implications for data applications built off the blockchain.

This had got me thinking about what problems cryptocurrency was actually best-suited to solve. The results of my thinking more or less landed me in the same boat as SK, with regard to a backbone currency and thinking of Peercoin as moreso solving the ACH problem, rather than the PayPal problem.

I have worries about the long-term survival of bitcoin.

Blockchain size and mining pools has devolved the bitcoin network into a (large) handful of supernodes. Additionally the consensus algorithm for bitcoin is tied to the physical world, rather than the virtual.

People think bitcoin will be here forever, even if it tanks. I don’t think so. I think a single market crash will be irrecoverable.

The reasoning is simple:

  • Over time, an equilibrium is reached between costs (e.g. electricity consumed) for miners and bitcoin reward from obtaining blocks.
  • Mining hardware does not go away when difficultly is lowered, as it exists in the physical realm. It merely gets turned off.
  • If the bitcoin market crashed to $1, the equilibrium of electricity cost / hashpower / bitcoin reward converted to $ is adjusted rapidly to prevent loss of $. This means a large percentage of miners would be no longer have an incentive to mine, as they would operate on a loss, and thus they would turn off their hardware…
  • Or would they? Now we have a bunch of miners with mining hardware, unable to mine because cost > block reward.
  • The incentive at that point is to use their massive hashpower to attack the network, rather than secure it. Recognizing there haven’t been any particularly interesting 51% attacks yet (other than Luke Jr’s on a altcoin), once the incentives are lined up I have no doubt people will get creative.

tl;dr
If bitcoin price tanks, a large % of miners will cease mining to secure the network because the cost of mining outweighs the reward. These miners still have their hardware though, and now have incentive to attack the network (as their is nothing else to do with their specialized hardware, and they gotta recoup those hardware costs somehow).

As such, I’m throwing in my towel for Peercoin as the long-term cryptocurrency. I think the incentives are correct, the consensus algorithm is better long-term, and I like the progress shown with cold minting.

I’m a programmer, and will be experimenting with some data-apps built off the peercoin blockchain. I’ll keep the community abreast of those as they develop (and look forwards to the sidechains for data-apps Sunny has been teasing us about). Looking forward to being involved here.

  • Emeth[/quote]

[quote=“emeth, post:39, topic:2889”]https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=895974.0

The conversation at the link above shows that some people are starting to think about this issue mentioned in my post below. Will be interesting to see what happens.[/quote]

Thanks for sharing this with us. It takes time for people to realize this. Unfortunately, I think most of them will rather prefer getting out of crypto rather than switching for a forked coin. Which is sad.

I’m not a spammer >:D.